Views Across the Loom: Horizontal Perspectives and Foundations of American Patchwork

Views Across the Loom: Horizontal Perspectives and Foundations of American Patchwork

The block-style, edge-to-edge geometry for which American quiltmaking is most famous developed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in communities and homes that relied on “homespun” for table and bed linens, and workaday garments. Along with agriculture and cooking, weaving constituted a major element of the pre-industrial economy. Looms were conspicuous features in many homes and home workshops, and many people were accustomed to looking at in-progress woven surfaces on a regular basis. These close-up views and horizontal perspectives were appreciated for their demonstrations of right-angle intersections, the optical mixing of color, and the relationships between microcosm and macrocosm—effects that would be dramatically animated by patchwork. Woven coverlets, quilts, and other textiles will testify to the generally overlooked connections between quiltmaking and weaving, which was originally the province of men trained in Europe’s master-apprentice tradition.

Event Date
Friday, May 1, 2020 to Sunday, September 27, 2020