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September 10, 2019 to February 23, 2020

Helen Claire Vlasin (1932 - 2012) was born in Spalding, Nebraska, and was a graduate of St. Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing in Lincoln, Nebraska; Central Michigan University; and Michigan State University. Claire’s initial educational experiences led her into nursing, but she later switched paths, turning to educational administration. Her family, including her beloved husband Ray and her children Theresa, Celia, Ilene, John, and Marie, as well as her large extended family, were another strong focus of her life.  

August 7, 2019 to November 20, 2019

The International Quilt Museum is pleased to showcase the important work of Mourning Hope Grief Center, a Lincoln-based organization that supports and comforts youth and their families in times of grief. Since 1994, Mourning Hope has provided free support groups, community education, grief resources, and referrals to grieving children, teens, young adults, and families who have lost someone. 

June 21, 2019 to November 30, 2019

"Quilts become archetypal symbols of the women who make them.
They 'stand in' for the quilter, long after she is gone,
revealing to descendants, viewers, or new owners
the essence of the quilter—her spirit, energy, vitality, and skill."
- Jean Ray Laury
Ho for California! Pioneer Women and Their Quilts

May 17, 2019 to September 22, 2019

Trained as a painter and an architect, Liz Axford turned to textiles in the context of the Studio Craft movement, which defined itself as a branch of art-making focused on material explorations. In 1985, Axford left a career designing generic commercial architecture and committed to a studio quiltmaking practice that remained steadfastly experimental for 35 years. 

July 5, 2019 to October 27, 2019

Quilts are double-sided by definition, but in reality, their utilitarian backs are often ignored in favor of their decorative tops. Emiko Toda Loeb’s quilts are meant to be viewed freestanding, from both sides. She uses a complex technique to sew two-sided Log Cabin blocks, and once assembled, they form two wholly different compositions. Loeb explores a range of geometric and biomorphic forms that break out of the rigid or repeat patterns typically associated with Log Cabin quilts. Sometimes, the elements on either side of a quilt echo one another.

September 6, 2019 to July 12, 2020

Old World Quilts transports us to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an age of burgeoning global commerce and cultural exchange. Here you will view some of the earliest textiles from the International Quilt Museum’s collection. In this era, Europe’s desire for goods from unfamiliar, “exotic” Asian cultures led to unprecedented growth in overseas trade, which also fueled a boom in domestic manufacturing and fed a growing consumer mentality.

April 24, 2019 to September 29, 2019

Kathleen Caraccio was born in the Bronx, New York in 1947. As a child, she was fluent in an “old world language” of needlework and manual dexterity, and remembers her parents’ support for her artistic inclinations as a kind of indulgence. In the 1960s, Caraccio’s artistic focus shifted to printmaking and works on paper, but she never lost her affinity for textiles.

 
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