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March 30, 2020

Amish Quilts from the 1970s & '80s

This group of Amish quilts adhere to the established standards of Amish quilts: solid-colored fabrics, hand-quilted in familiar designs, such as feather and cable borders, and sober austerity. All of the quilts conform to a nearly identical format: repeated patchwork designs surrounded by two contrasting borders, with a binding that matches the interior border. 

February 25, 2020 to August 9, 2020

Barbara Caron began making these small-scale quilts before she relocated to Lincoln to serve as the assistant director of the International Quilt Museum (2007-2012). Her work as an educator and her early years as a librarian are evident in the quilts. As small teaching tools, they are “… like the pages of a book,” says Caron—each one telling a story distinct from, yet connected with, each of the others.

November 26, 2019 to May 17, 2020

Blue images in each of these quilts were created through the cyanotype process discovered in 1842 by English scientist Sir John Hershel. The process involves treating cloth or paper with a solution of two chemicals (ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide) that, when exposed to ultra-violet light, develop an intense blue color, also called Prussian blue. To create images, one places either objects or film positives/negatives on the treated material. These prevent light from activating the chemicals and thereby produce negative images of themselves.

April 3, 2020 to August 30, 2020

Russian Quilts at the Turn of the 21st Century

December 6, 2019 to June 21, 2020

In one Japanese dialect, champloo is a culinary term meaning “mixed up” or “blended together,” but colloquially, it refers to improvising or making things up as you go along. This is what the two heroes of the popular Japanese animated television series Samurai Champloo must do to reconcile their substantial differences as they battle corruption and defend the innocent.

November 1, 2019 to April 26, 2020

Diana Harrison’s quilts and textile hangings reflect a contrast of strength and quiet, of precision and happenstance, of wear and long-lasting presence. The forms are strong and deliberate, yet the overall effect is contemplative and thoughtful. In some pieces, the quilting stitches are linear and remarkably even, thus contrasting dramatically with the rough, hardened surfaces. The shapes are purposefully imperfect, with deliberately unfinished edges, loosely hanging threads, and hazily blurred markings.

October 2, 2019 to April 12, 2020

Artist Rumi O’Brien’s quilts are intimate narratives of her life. Whether set in her everyday world of Madison, Wisconsin or in an imaginary landscape, the quilts are always deeply personal. 
 
Rumi O’Brien grew up in Tokyo, Japan, the daughter of seminal manga (comic book) artist Katsuji Matsumoto. Later, she moved to the United States to train as a watercolorist. For the past 50 years she has lived in Madison, where, several decades ago, she also began making quilts.
 

September 6, 2019 to July 12, 2020

Old World Quilts transports us to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an age of burgeoning global commerce and cultural exchange. Here you will view some of the earliest textiles from the International Quilt Museum’s collection. In this era, Europe’s desire for goods from unfamiliar, “exotic” Asian cultures led to unprecedented growth in overseas trade, which also fueled a boom in domestic manufacturing and fed a growing consumer mentality.

 
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