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September 10, 2019 to February 23, 2020

Helen Claire Vlasin (1932 - 2012) was born in Spalding, Nebraska, and was a graduate of St. Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing in Lincoln, Nebraska; Central Michigan University; and Michigan State University. Claire’s initial educational experiences led her into nursing, but she later switched paths, turning to educational administration. Her family, including her beloved husband Ray and her children Theresa, Celia, Ilene, John, and Marie, as well as her large extended family, were another strong focus of her life.  

November 1, 2019 to April 26, 2020

Diana Harrison’s quilts and textile hangings reflect a contrast of strength and quiet, of precision and happenstance, of wear and long-lasting presence. The forms are strong and deliberate, yet the overall effect is contemplative and thoughtful. In some pieces, the quilting stitches are linear and remarkably even, thus contrasting dramatically with the rough, hardened surfaces. The shapes are purposefully imperfect, with deliberately unfinished edges, loosely hanging threads, and hazily blurred markings.

September 27, 2019 to March 29, 2020

Shapeshifters inaugurates the New Views exhibition series in which quilts collected over the last 20 years will be exhibited at the International Quilt Museum for the first time. Made between 1830 and 1930, the quilts in Shapeshifters rely primarily on appliqué for their lively effects. All are exemplars of the rich and wide-ranging tradition of American quiltmaking, and the visual and material culture in which it developed.

June 21, 2019 to November 30, 2019

"Quilts become archetypal symbols of the women who make them.
They 'stand in' for the quilter, long after she is gone,
revealing to descendants, viewers, or new owners
the essence of the quilter—her spirit, energy, vitality, and skill."
- Jean Ray Laury
Ho for California! Pioneer Women and Their Quilts

October 2, 2019 to April 12, 2020

Artist Rumi O’Brien’s quilts are intimate narratives of her life. Whether set in her everyday world of Madison, Wisconsin or in an imaginary landscape, the quilts are always deeply personal. 
 
Rumi O’Brien grew up in Tokyo, Japan, the daughter of seminal manga (comic book) artist Katsuji Matsumoto. Later, she moved to the United States to train as a watercolorist. For the past 50 years she has lived in Madison, where, several decades ago, she also began making quilts.
 

September 6, 2019 to July 12, 2020

Old World Quilts transports us to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an age of burgeoning global commerce and cultural exchange. Here you will view some of the earliest textiles from the International Quilt Museum’s collection. In this era, Europe’s desire for goods from unfamiliar, “exotic” Asian cultures led to unprecedented growth in overseas trade, which also fueled a boom in domestic manufacturing and fed a growing consumer mentality.

 
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