Past

April 16, 2019 to September 8, 2019

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the charter that established the University of Nebraska as the state’s land grant institution of higher education. 

December 6, 2019 to March 15, 2020

In one Japanese dialect, champloo is a culinary term meaning “mixed up” or “blended together,” but colloquially, it refers to improvising or making things up as you go along. This is what the two heroes of the popular Japanese animated television series Samurai Champloo must do to reconcile their substantial differences as they battle corruption and defend the innocent.

November 1, 2019 to March 15, 2020

Diana Harrison’s quilts and textile hangings reflect a contrast of strength and quiet, of precision and happenstance, of wear and long-lasting presence. The forms are strong and deliberate, yet the overall effect is contemplative and thoughtful. In some pieces, the quilting stitches are linear and remarkably even, thus contrasting dramatically with the rough, hardened surfaces. The shapes are purposefully imperfect, with deliberately unfinished edges, loosely hanging threads, and hazily blurred markings.

September 27, 2019 to March 29, 2020

Shapeshifters inaugurates the New Views exhibition series in which quilts collected over the last 20 years will be exhibited at the International Quilt Museum for the first time. Made between 1830 and 1930, the quilts in Shapeshifters rely primarily on appliqué for their lively effects. All are exemplars of the rich and wide-ranging tradition of American quiltmaking, and the visual and material culture in which it developed.

June 21, 2019 to November 30, 2019

"Quilts become archetypal symbols of the women who make them.
They 'stand in' for the quilter, long after she is gone,
revealing to descendants, viewers, or new owners
the essence of the quilter—her spirit, energy, vitality, and skill."
- Jean Ray Laury
Ho for California! Pioneer Women and Their Quilts

May 17, 2019 to September 22, 2019

Trained as a painter and an architect, Liz Axford turned to textiles in the context of the Studio Craft movement, which defined itself as a branch of art-making focused on material explorations. In 1985, Axford left a career designing generic commercial architecture and committed to a studio quiltmaking practice that remained steadfastly experimental for 35 years. 

April 2, 2019 to August 4, 2019

Thirty years ago, a group of artists met at a gallery in Atlanta to discuss the formation of an organization dedicated to celebrating a new type of quilt: the “art quilt.” Art quilts transformed the traditional functionality of quilts. They are meant to be exhibited as innovative and experimental works of art.

December 11, 2018 to April 7, 2019

Students in Professor David Newton’s Fall, 2018 junior design studio considered the role of museums in the 21st century. Are they community centers? Cathedrals for contemplation and communion with objects? What are the benefits—and challenges—of collections-based institutions? What role should technology play in the museum experience?

October 2, 2019 to March 15, 2020

Artist Rumi O’Brien’s quilts are intimate narratives of her life. Whether set in her everyday world of Madison, Wisconsin or in an imaginary landscape, the quilts are always deeply personal. 
 
Rumi O’Brien grew up in Tokyo, Japan, the daughter of seminal manga (comic book) artist Katsuji Matsumoto. Later, she moved to the United States to train as a watercolorist. For the past 50 years she has lived in Madison, where, several decades ago, she also began making quilts.
 

July 5, 2019 to October 27, 2019

Quilts are double-sided by definition, but in reality, their utilitarian backs are often ignored in favor of their decorative tops. Emiko Toda Loeb’s quilts are meant to be viewed freestanding, from both sides. She uses a complex technique to sew two-sided Log Cabin blocks, and once assembled, they form two wholly different compositions. Loeb explores a range of geometric and biomorphic forms that break out of the rigid or repeat patterns typically associated with Log Cabin quilts. Sometimes, the elements on either side of a quilt echo one another.

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