Past

January 19, 2018 to May 13, 2018

As a collector, I'm looking for something that reflects my country back at me. Quilts rearrange my molecules when I look at them. There's an enormous satisfaction in having them close by. I'm not a materialist. There are too many things in the world, and we know that the best things in life aren't things. Yet there are a few things that remind me of the bigger picture.

We live in a rational world. One and one always equals two. That's okay, but we actually want—in our faith, in our families, in our friendships, in our love, in our art—for one and one to equal three.

February 28, 2020 to February 29, 2020

In collaboration with Lincoln's NAACP Youth chapter, the International Quilt Museum will hold a pop-up exhibit "Celebrating Black Quiltmakers" on February 28-29, 2020, in the Byron & Sara Rhodes Dillow Conservation Work Room.

Visitors will see several works from our collection as well as a special display of new paper pieces made by NAACP Youth members.

February 25, 2020 to August 9, 2020

Barbara Caron began making these small-scale quilts before she relocated to Lincoln to serve as the assistant director of the International Quilt Museum (2007-2012). Her work as an educator and her early years as a librarian are evident in the quilts. As small teaching tools, they are “… like the pages of a book,” says Caron—each one telling a story distinct from, yet connected with, each of the others.

November 26, 2019 to March 15, 2020

Blue images in each of these quilts were created through the cyanotype process discovered in 1842 by English scientist Sir John Hershel. The process involves treating cloth or paper with a solution of two chemicals (ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide) that, when exposed to ultra-violet light, develop an intense blue color, also called Prussian blue. To create images, one places either objects or film positives/negatives on the treated material. These prevent light from activating the chemicals and thereby produce negative images of themselves.

September 10, 2019 to February 8, 2020

Helen Claire Vlasin (1932 - 2012) was born in Spalding, Nebraska, and was a graduate of St. Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing in Lincoln, Nebraska; Central Michigan University; and Michigan State University. Claire’s initial educational experiences led her into nursing, but she later switched paths, turning to educational administration. Her family, including her beloved husband Ray and her children Theresa, Celia, Ilene, John, and Marie, as well as her large extended family, were another strong focus of her life.  

August 7, 2019 to November 20, 2019

The International Quilt Museum is pleased to showcase the important work of Mourning Hope Grief Center, a Lincoln-based organization that supports and comforts youth and their families in times of grief. Since 1994, Mourning Hope has provided free support groups, community education, grief resources, and referrals to grieving children, teens, young adults, and families who have lost someone. 

March 30, 2008 to August 31, 2008

The quilts of Nancy Crow: Cloth, Culture & Context represent the artist’s exploration of the quilt medium over the last thirty years. From early pieces that draw upon classic American quilt patterns to her later freeform, abstract compositions, Crow has developed a body of work that continues to confront, expand, and redefine her vision. She constantly seeks visual inspiration, using her discriminating eye to draw influence from the natural world, the built environment, and textiles and various handicraft traditions from cultures worldwide.

January 16, 2009 to April 5, 2009

The quilts in this exhibition celebrate the eye-catching visual effects that makers create using stripes. The quilts illustrate the dynamic, appealing nature of the stripe. Medieval history scholar, Michel Pastoureau suggests that the striped surface calls for attention in a way that other surfaces don’t. Referring to the ambiguous relationship between foreground and background that stripes create, he asks, “Does the eye see that which fools it more clearly?” Are eyes attracted to striped surfaces because they are more complex?

October 7, 2014 to October 13, 2014

The star is an important symbol in traditional Lakota mythology and art. The story of the morning star describes how an old medicine man became the morning star after his death. The morning star was considered to have more power than the sun or moon because of the experience the medicine man gained from living on earth. Consequently, the morning star was a symbol for wisdom and understanding.

March 31, 2015 to August 2, 2015

Growing up on a Minnesota farm and living in New York City for the past two decades has given Victoria Findlay Wolfe a unique perspective in her art. Indeed, her work often moves cyclically between references to her rural familial roots and her current cosmopolitan locale. She is both a woman with strong Midwestern sensibilities and a leader of the now-global Modern Quilt movement. Combined, these attributes result in a body of work she aptly describes as “traditions made modern.”

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