Past

January 19, 2018 to May 13, 2018

As a collector, I'm looking for something that reflects my country back at me. Quilts rearrange my molecules when I look at them. There's an enormous satisfaction in having them close by. I'm not a materialist. There are too many things in the world, and we know that the best things in life aren't things. Yet there are a few things that remind me of the bigger picture.

We live in a rational world. One and one always equals two. That's okay, but we actually want—in our faith, in our families, in our friendships, in our love, in our art—for one and one to equal three.

March 30, 2008 to August 31, 2008

The quilts of Nancy Crow: Cloth, Culture & Context represent the artist’s exploration of the quilt medium over the last thirty years. From early pieces that draw upon classic American quilt patterns to her later freeform, abstract compositions, Crow has developed a body of work that continues to confront, expand, and redefine her vision. She constantly seeks visual inspiration, using her discriminating eye to draw influence from the natural world, the built environment, and textiles and various handicraft traditions from cultures worldwide.

January 16, 2009 to April 5, 2009

The quilts in this exhibition celebrate the eye-catching visual effects that makers create using stripes. The quilts illustrate the dynamic, appealing nature of the stripe. Medieval history scholar, Michel Pastoureau suggests that the striped surface calls for attention in a way that other surfaces don’t. Referring to the ambiguous relationship between foreground and background that stripes create, he asks, “Does the eye see that which fools it more clearly?” Are eyes attracted to striped surfaces because they are more complex?

October 7, 2014 to October 13, 2014

The star is an important symbol in traditional Lakota mythology and art. The story of the morning star describes how an old medicine man became the morning star after his death. The morning star was considered to have more power than the sun or moon because of the experience the medicine man gained from living on earth. Consequently, the morning star was a symbol for wisdom and understanding.

March 31, 2015 to August 2, 2015

Growing up on a Minnesota farm and living in New York City for the past two decades has given Victoria Findlay Wolfe a unique perspective in her art. Indeed, her work often moves cyclically between references to her rural familial roots and her current cosmopolitan locale. She is both a woman with strong Midwestern sensibilities and a leader of the now-global Modern Quilt movement. Combined, these attributes result in a body of work she aptly describes as “traditions made modern.”

September 29, 2015 to October 11, 2015

As a young girl, Mary Catherine Lamb (1949-2009) saved mementos from her Roman Catholic childhood in Oakland, California. Years later, Lamb was stirred by the “holy cards” and other faded religious relics she stumbled upon when clearing out the family home. By this time a disaffected Catholic, Lamb began to make art quilts through which she could, as she said, “embrace the images in a completely different way, on my own terms.” 

December 11, 2018 to April 7, 2019

Students in Professor David Newton’s Fall, 2018 junior design studio considered the role of museums in the 21st century. Are they community centers? Cathedrals for contemplation and communion with objects? What are the benefits—and challenges—of collections-based institutions? What role should technology play in the museum experience?

November 20, 2018 to March 31, 2019

The European Patchwork Meeting convenes every year in Ste-Marie-aux-Mines, in northeastern France, to celebrate the art of quilting. Bordered by Germany and Switzerland, the Alsace region was the birthplace of the Amish movement. In 1693, the followers of Jakob Ammann broke off from their
fellow Anabaptists, and in the early 1900s, many Amish immigrated to Pennsylvania. Today, the Amish are strongly associated with their quilts, which are famous for their bold colors, simple geometry, and fine needlework.

November 2, 2018 to March 10, 2019

In 1997, I was a master’s student at Indiana University. I had just completed and submitted my application for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s  doctorate program in Textiles, Clothing and Design. My goal was to study quilts with Professor Patricia Crews, a professor doing groundbreaking research in textile history. I wasn’t sure what career path that would lead to,  I was only thinking one step at a time. 

November 2, 2018 to November 4, 2018

Power, Passion, and Politics was curated by six high school students from Lincoln Public School’s Arts and Humanities Focus Program. Each member of the Politics and Government class, taught by John Clark, selected a politically- or socially-themed quilt from the permanent collection of the International Quilt Museum. Students were able to engage with the quilts in person before writing their labels. Each student composed text contextualizing and explaining the importance of the quilt they selected.

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