Past

January 19, 2018 to May 13, 2018

As a collector, I'm looking for something that reflects my country back at me. Quilts rearrange my molecules when I look at them. There's an enormous satisfaction in having them close by. I'm not a materialist. There are too many things in the world, and we know that the best things in life aren't things. Yet there are a few things that remind me of the bigger picture.

We live in a rational world. One and one always equals two. That's okay, but we actually want—in our faith, in our families, in our friendships, in our love, in our art—for one and one to equal three.

March 20, 2021

Traditionally on National Quilting Day at the International Quilt Museum, we line the Reception Hall railing with quilts made by members of our local quilt guilds and community.

For this year's virtual National Quilting Day celebration, we asked some of our volunteers and staff members to share quilts from their personal collections. Some of these quilts were made by the volunteer or staff member. Some are cherished keepsakes. 

Each has a story.

We hope you will enjoy this National Quilting Day Community Showcase Virtual Pop-Up.

January 5, 2021 to June 13, 2021

Some of the most visually intriguing quilts are surprisingly simple. Such quilts may feature one basic shape, as in the Tumbling Block and Nine Patch quilts displayed nearby, or only two colors, as in the Oak Leaf variation and Log Cabin quilts. Rather than restricting design, these characteristics provide nearly unlimited license to create patterned surfaces, the illusion of a third dimension, and subtle shifts from light to dark. 

February 1, 2021 to February 28, 2021

In this second annual collaboration with Lincoln’s NAACP Youth Council, the International Quilt Museum is featuring a virtual pop-up that pairs the work of African American quiltmakers with responses from local students in Lincoln Public Schools. The students examined quilts by Sarah Mary Taylor, Nora McKeown Ezell, Mary Maxtion, Yvonne Wells and Faith Ringgold, and crafted reaction statements that explore ideas of design, color and emotion, as well as connections to their own life experiences.

January 6, 2021 to June 5, 2021

Amish quilts captured the interest of New York art dealers and collectors in the early 1970s because of their similarities to modern abstract painting. Soon, they were adorning the interiors of urban lofts and spread across the pages of home decorating magazines. Classic Amish styles are among the most recognizable and copied of American quilt styles.

February 10, 2021 to June 26, 2021

Textile artist Amy Meissner gathers cast-off and salvaged women’s handwork, household textiles, and found objects. In these artifacts, she sees the tracings of women’s knowledge, decisions, and intentions. Her quilted art made for vertical display, which incorporates these objects, emerges as an amalgam of traditional handwork and female points of view, of historic roles and contemporary complaints, which serve to expose women’s emotional, physical, and literal labor.

October 20, 2020 to October 31, 2020

Join sites across Nebraska, on and off the University of Nebraska -Lincoln campus, for Hostile Terrain 94, an exhibit about the humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border and how it connects with Nebraska stories and communities.

August 4, 2020 to December 22, 2020

Each month on their way to a meeting room here at the International Quilt Museum, the Lincoln Modern Quilt Guild (LMQG) members pass a large digital rendering of the quilt Big Blue. Ardis James, a quiltmaker and philanthropist whose vision for a quilt museum is part of the IQM's history, made the quilt. Big Blue is an Album Sampler quilt, meaning its design is a collection of different quilt patterns. LMQG members challenged themselves to each create a spin-off (an adaptation, outgrowth, or development of another similar thing) of one of the blocks in James's quilt.

June 19, 2020 to June 21, 2020

Tonight, where would you go to find safety if you were forced to flee your home? How would displacement and the impossibility of returning home change the course of your life?

May 1, 2020

“Nothing has taken a stronger hold on the women —
Crazy quilts have engulfed us.”
- Dorcas magazine, 1884

Arising in the last quarter of the Nineteenth Century, the high-style crazy quilt trend incorporated motifs from Japanese art and decor, English embroidery, and fairyland, among others. Like many textiles, however, the legacy of the crazy quilt is complicated. Women were urged by magazines to create crazy quilts, the more elaborate the better, yet they were mocked in newspapers and periodicals for doing so.  

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