Past

January 19, 2018 to May 13, 2018

As a collector, I'm looking for something that reflects my country back at me. Quilts rearrange my molecules when I look at them. There's an enormous satisfaction in having them close by. I'm not a materialist. There are too many things in the world, and we know that the best things in life aren't things. Yet there are a few things that remind me of the bigger picture.

We live in a rational world. One and one always equals two. That's okay, but we actually want—in our faith, in our families, in our friendships, in our love, in our art—for one and one to equal three.

October 20, 2020 to October 31, 2020

Join sites across Nebraska, on and off the University of Nebraska -Lincoln campus, for Hostile Terrain 94, an exhibit about the humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border and how it connects with Nebraska stories and communities.

August 4, 2020 to December 22, 2020

Each month on their way to a meeting room here at the International Quilt Museum, the Lincoln Modern Quilt Guild (LMQG) members pass a large digital rendering of the quilt Big Blue. Ardis James, a quiltmaker and philanthropist whose vision for a quilt museum is part of the IQM's history, made the quilt. Big Blue is an Album Sampler quilt, meaning its design is a collection of different quilt patterns. LMQG members challenged themselves to each create a spin-off (an adaptation, outgrowth, or development of another similar thing) of one of the blocks in James's quilt.

June 19, 2020 to June 21, 2020

Tonight, where would you go to find safety if you were forced to flee your home? How would displacement and the impossibility of returning home change the course of your life?

May 1, 2020

“Nothing has taken a stronger hold on the women —
Crazy quilts have engulfed us.”
- Dorcas magazine, 1884

Arising in the last quarter of the Nineteenth Century, the high-style crazy quilt trend incorporated motifs from Japanese art and decor, English embroidery, and fairyland, among others. Like many textiles, however, the legacy of the crazy quilt is complicated. Women were urged by magazines to create crazy quilts, the more elaborate the better, yet they were mocked in newspapers and periodicals for doing so.  

March 30, 2020

Amish Quilts from the 1970s & '80s

This group of Amish quilts adhere to the established standards of Amish quilts: solid-colored fabrics, hand-quilted in familiar designs, such as feather and cable borders, and sober austerity. All of the quilts conform to a nearly identical format: repeated patchwork designs surrounded by two contrasting borders, with a binding that matches the interior border. 

February 28, 2020 to February 29, 2020

In collaboration with Lincoln's NAACP Youth chapter, the International Quilt Museum will hold a pop-up exhibit "Celebrating Black Quiltmakers" on February 28-29, 2020, in the Byron & Sara Rhodes Dillow Conservation Work Room.

Visitors will see several works from our collection as well as a special display of new paper pieces made by NAACP Youth members.

August 4, 2020 to November 25, 2020

We are a group of artists who feel our hearts beating to the rhythm of the Earth.
 
As the environment deteriorates due to climate change and global pollution, some may deny or look away, but we are seeking to express the pain in our hearts for what we see is being destroyed and perhaps lost forever. For our families, our communities, the planet Earth and all her inhabitants, we have something to say. We listen to the sacred stories of indigenous people, and we celebrate the beauty of our world.
 

July 1, 2020 to July 5, 2020

“Politics makes for strange bedfellows,” wrote Charles Warner, editor of the Hartford Courant in 1850. By extension, politics makes for sometimes strange, and always interesting, bedcovers. The quilts of Partisan Pieces made in the 1800s and 1900s illuminate the progress of U. S. political development from the perspective, and from the needles, of well-informed and patriotic women. 

February 25, 2020 to December 22, 2020

Barbara Caron began making these small-scale quilts before she relocated to Lincoln to serve as the assistant director of the International Quilt Museum (2007-2012). Her work as an educator and her early years as a librarian are evident in the quilts. As small teaching tools, they are “… like the pages of a book,” says Caron—each one telling a story distinct from, yet connected with, each of the others.

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