Modern Meets Modern

Modern Meets Modern

September 16, 2021 - March 19, 2022
West Gallery

What happens when yesterday’s Modern meets today’s Modern?

Today’s quiltmakers are finding ways to reimagine what a quilt can look like. In this effort, they sometimes employ bold colors, large areas of negative space, improvisational piecing, asymmetry, and unexpected visual juxtapositions to construct novel, fresh, Modern quilts. The Modern Quilt Movement and its graphically sophisticated outcomes have become hallmarks of 21st-century quiltmaking.

150 years ago, quilts were undergoing a different transformation. American industry, commerce, and society were modernizing rapidly. This Modern Age of quiltmaking (1870-1940) was defined by new tools, materials, techniques, visual references, and participants. More people could afford to make quilts, using fabrics, implements, and pattern inspirations previously unknown or unavailable. In some ways, the same is true today.

Come explore what happens when today’s Modern and yesterday’s Modern are brought together in ways that reveal quiltmaking synergies across the ages.

Gallery Photos

Gallery Photos
Gallery Photos

Virtual Gallery

Virtual Gallery
Virtual Gallery

Modern Meets Modern: Separated at Birth? Nope, Separated by 100+ Years

Modern Meets Modern: Separated at Birth? Nope, Separated by 100+ Years

Ocean Waves variation
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Pennsylvania, 1880-1900
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection
IQM 2003.003.0183

Go North
Maritza Soto
Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2017
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Modern Quilt Guild Collection, Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Foundation, IQM 2021.042.0001

Modern Moment: Go North wins the Quilting Excellence award at QuiltCon 2017

Modern Meets Modern: Separated at Birth? Nope, Separated by 100+ Years

TRIANGULATIONS: Equilateral, isosceles, acute, oblique, right (“half-square” in quiltmaking lingo)— triangles of all forms appear in quilts, old and new.

TRIANGULATIONS: Equilateral, isosceles, acute, oblique, right (“half-square” in quiltmaking lingo)— triangles of all forms appear in quilts, old and new.

Fractured Triangles (based on the pattern “Fractal Radiance” by Katie Larson)
Paula Leber, quilted by Denise Pitts Best
Merriam, Kansas, 2015
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Foundation, IQM 2015.011.0001

A masterful use of value (lights and darks) gives this composition of triangles a three-dimensional effect—almost like facets on a gemstone or a mountain range viewed from above.

Modern Moment: Fractured Triangles is juried into QuiltCon 2015.

Thousand Pyramids
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Pennsylvania, 1890-1910
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
IQM, Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0137

Placing equilateral triangles in a precisely fitted grid like this is called “tessellation.”

Log Cabin, Courthouse Steps variation
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Ohio, 1870-1890
Silk; hand pieced, quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0245

When the diagonally divided quadrants of a Courthouse Steps block are formed with alternating values (lights and darks), triangles with stair-stepped edges appear.

Lily
Maker unidentified
Made in the United States, 1925-1935
Cotton; hand pieced, appliquéd and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0886

Right (“half-square,” as quiltmakers call them) triangles combine with rhombi (diamonds) to form this quilt’s vase and flowers motifs.

Wild Goose Chase
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Pennsylvania, dated November 29, 1902
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0521

With the exception of its long red borders, this quilt is entirely composed of right (“half-square”) triangles.

TRIANGULATIONS: Equilateral, isosceles, acute, oblique, right (“half-square” in quiltmaking lingo)— triangles of all forms appear in quilts, old and new.

SQUARED OFF: The simple square can accomplish so much when paired with other squares—even produce optical illusions.

SQUARED OFF: The simple square can accomplish so much when paired with other squares—even produce optical illusions.

Outside the Box
Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr
Oak Park, Illinois, 2004
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Gift of Linda Pumphrey, IQM 2020.008.0001

Clever but simple block construction in this iconic early Modern Quilt Movement quilt creates the illusion of squares floating above squares.

Modern Moment: Ringle and Kerr put Outside the Box up for auction in 2020 to raise funds for the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, which supports black students and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The quilt is subsequently donated to the IQM.

Log Cabin, Light and Dark setting
Maker unidentified
Made in the United States, 1880-1900
Cotton; machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Kathlyn F. Sullivan Collection, 2014.049.0007

Lighter-colored fabrics combine to form squares that float above a dark background. Or is it the other way around: dark squares hover above a light background?

Split Nine Patch, Barn Raising setting
Maker unidentified
Probably made in Pennsylvania, 1910-1930
Cotton; machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0346

Can you find the individual construction units? They are Nine Patch blocks split diagonally into light and dark halves.

Square in a Square
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Illinois, 1900-1920
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0181

These square-within-a-square motifs fit neatly together but their value contrast (lights and darks) creates an active, less controlled appearance.

Carpenter’s Square
Maker unidentified
Made in the United States, 1880-1900
Cotton; hand and machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0939

Large white interlacing motifs hover above a dark blue background—but where does this knot begin and where does it end?

SQUARED OFF: The simple square can accomplish so much when paired with other squares—even produce optical illusions.

Everything Old Is New Again?

Everything Old Is New Again?
Everything Old Is New Again?

In some ways, today’s Modern quilts are nothing new. Even in the Modern Age of the late 1800s and early 1900s, American quiltmakers employed bold colors, improvisational piecing, and quirky aesthetic approaches. Innovation and tradition-tweaking are how quilts have evolved decade after decade, century after century. In this way, some old quilts can look incredibly new.

In other ways, 21st-century Modern quiltmaking is quite different. The boundary pushing of many Modern makers is more deliberate than in the past. In addition, instantaneous online communication has facilitated a new level of community building and interplay among quiltmakers, which has produced a synergy that gives the Modern Quilt Movement a youthful appeal.

Looking at the two eras of Modern quilts side by side, both the similarities and the differences become apparent. Quiltmakers have always searched for new methods and perspectives, even when working from an established pattern. But 21st-century Modern quiltmakers have taken tradition and injected it with a new energy, one that honors the past while adding something wholly new to the mix.

GOING IN CIRCLES: Circular shapes can be created in different ways, both directly and indirectly.

GOING IN CIRCLES: Circular shapes can be created in different ways, both directly and indirectly.

Double Edged Love
Victoria Findlay Wolfe, quilted by Lisa Sipes
New York, New York, 2013
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Victoria Findlay Wolfe Collection, Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Collection, IQM 2016.009.0004

Circles appear seemingly out of nowhere and then merge into others. Even though it was made using a Double Wedding Ring pattern, Double Edged Love seems to be a distant, edgier cousin.

Modern Moment: Entered in the "Modern Traditional" category, Double Edged Love wins Best in Show in 2013 at the inaugural QuiltCon.

Wagon Wheel
Maker unidentified
Made in the United States, dated 1926
Cotton; hand appliquéd, machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0315

Perfectly round red and white wagon wheels evoke 1920s nostalgia for America’s pioneer days of a half-century earlier.

Log Cabin, Pineapple variation
Maker unidentified
Made in the United States, 1890-1910
Cotton; hand pieced and tied
IQM, Byron and Sara Rhodes Dillow Collection, 2008.040.0222

Although the darker “X” shapes are visually dominant, when you stand back and squint your eyes do circles start to appear as the angled lines meet?

Springtime in the Rockies (Capper’s Weekly pattern)
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Maryland, dated 1935
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0165

Rays emerging from partial circles evoke sunrises and sunsets. Do your eyes want to join the quarter circles into whole units, even though they are separated by green and white sashing?

Double Wedding Ring
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Kentucky, 1930-1940
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0498

Double Wedding Ring is a classic 1930s quilt pattern, especially in this ombré format (colors gradually shifting from one to another).

GOING IN CIRCLES: Circular shapes can be created in different ways, both directly and indirectly.

CENTRALITY: Unlike those made with repeating block units, medallion-style quilts draw focus immediately to the center, with boldly unified visual results.

CENTRALITY: Unlike those made with repeating block units, medallion-style quilts draw focus immediately to the center, with boldly unified visual results.

Psychedelic Baby
Katie Pedersen
Seattle, Washington, 2011
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Gift of Sandra Sider, IQM 2018.091.0001

“Wonky” strip-pieced fabrics, cut apart into blocks and reassembled in a diamond grid, form a center field that is simultaneously off-kilter and harmonious.

Modern Moment: Psychedelic Baby is juried into QuiltCon 2013.

Sunflower (Mountain Mist pattern “P,” 1930)
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Ohio, dated January 1, 1943
Cotton; hand appliquéd, pieced and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0496

Transforming negative space into a quilt’s central focus was a novel thing for a 1930s pattern designer to do. Today, however, it is a frequent element of Modern quiltmaking.

Poppy (Marie Webster pattern, 1912)
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Indiana, circa 1912
Cotton; hand appliquéd, machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0807

Like a perfectly framed picture, a roundel of art nouveau poppy bouquets is symmetrically surrounded by a row of blooms and buds.

Trip around the World
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Pennsylvania, 1890-1910
Cotton; hand and machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0242

Two different sizes of squares arranged in concentric rings create visual movement. Do your eyes see general vibrations or is the effect more like a magnet pulling you inwards?

Star of Bethlehem
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Pennsylvania, 1900-1920
Cotton; hand and machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0374

This Star of Bethlehem’s classic central focus—created with 2,888 diamonds—is enhanced by the octagon formed by lines connecting each star point.

CENTRALITY: Unlike those made with repeating block units, medallion-style quilts draw focus immediately to the center, with boldly unified visual results.

Modern vs. Modern: What were some major quiltmaking changes in the two different Modern eras?

Modern vs. Modern: What were some major quiltmaking changes in the two different Modern eras?
Modern vs. Modern: What were some major quiltmaking changes in the two different Modern eras?

Turn of the 20th century

21st century

FABRICS

After the Civil War, factories started producing greater quantities of fabric, which sold at prices that most people could afford. Solids and prints, of varying quality and colorfastness, were widely available.

QUILT STYLES

Modern Age quilts moved through a wide range of styles, from elaborately embroidered Crazy quilts in the 1870s and ‘80s to brightly colored pieced quilts in the 1920s and ‘30s.

TECHNOLOGY

Sewing machines became less expensive and made constructing a quilt a much quicker process. As a result, many more quilts were made in the Modern Age than in previous decades.

COMMUNICATION

The U.S. Postal Service expanded its services, magazines and newspapers increased advertising, and businesses embraced mail order, making it easy to get quiltmaking supplies delivered right to your door.

MAKERS

All of the above contributed to the democratization of quiltmaking—people of different classes and backgrounds began to quilt.

FABRICS

Commercially produced fabrics remained popular but new options emerged, such as creating a fabric design and having it digitally printed by an online company.

QUILT STYLES

Some quiltmakers moved sharply away from mainstream and traditional styles and focused on making so-called “Modern” quilts: graphically sophisticated with bold colors, asymmetry, negative space, and more.

TECHNOLOGY

Throughout American history, quilts generally were hand quilted. Ever since long-arm quilting machines became commercially available in the 1990s, the situation has dramatically changed—a majority are now machine quilted.

COMMUNICATION

With the advent of widespread internet access, quiltmakers were better equipped to find like-minded makers and to share their work with the world online. Shopping for fabric and tools also became easier.

MAKERS

All of the above led to a broader awareness of quilts, and a DIY spirit brought new people to quiltmaking as a hobby, personal expression, and livelihood.

 

DOTS & DASHES: Dots and dashes form the basis of Morse code—a communication method originally developed for the 19th-century telegraph—but in quilts they create altogether different patterns.

DOTS & DASHES: Dots and dashes form the basis of Morse code—a communication method originally developed for the 19th-century telegraph—but in quilts they create altogether different patterns.

Smart is Beautiful #2
Thomas Knauer
Clinton, New York, 2015
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Foundation, IQM 2016.063.0003

Just like Morse Code, these dots and dashes are a cipher. In a pattern formed using binary code (0s and 1s), the artist placed the white squares in each quilt block to indicate an alphabetical letter. As a message to his young daughter, he spelled out, “Smart is beautiful.”

Modern Moment: Thomas Knauer makes Smart is Beautiful #2 in 2015 especially for the International Quilt Museum. 

Baskets
Maker unidentified
Probably made in Pennsylvania, 1890-1910
Cotton; machine pieced and appliquéd, hand quilted
IQM, Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0345

The carefully crafted baskets—with machine-appliquéd handles—are nearly overwhelmed by the rusty brown dots and bright mustard dashes of the quilt’s sashing.

Four Patch variation
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in West Virginia, 1920-1940
Cotton; machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0176

A multitude of colorful dots (420 roughly one-inch squares) in an unnamed pattern contrasts pleasantly with elegant, curvilinear quilting patterns.

Burgoyne Surrounded
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in West Virginia, 1935-1945
Cotton; hand and machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0177

Blue, yellow, and red squares and rectangles are expertly configured to imitate early American woven coverlets, textiles whose dots and dashes were formed through the complex interlacing of warp and weft threads. 

One Patch
Maker unidentified
Probably made in Pennsylvania, 1920-1940
Cotton; machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0143

Like pixels in an early 8-bit video game, these dots seem to possess motion as each diagonal row visually shifts from one to the next, cycling through each gradated color.

DOTS & DASHES: Dots and dashes form the basis of Morse code—a communication method originally developed for the 19th-century telegraph—but in quilts they create altogether different patterns.

HIDDEN MESSAGES: Quilts are a form of visual communication. What they communicate is sometimes immediately apparent. At other times, cracking their code can be more difficult.

HIDDEN MESSAGES: Quilts are a form of visual communication. What they communicate is sometimes immediately apparent. At other times, cracking their code can be more difficult.

Hidden Messages
Kathy York
Austin, Texas, 2019
Cotton; hand appliquéd, machine quilted
Gift of Kathy York Collection, IQM, 2020.034.0001

In this quilt, appliquéd letters spell out a quotation from American essayist and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson, but the letters are hidden. Only when the quilt is backlit can the message be seen: "Do not say things. What you are stands over you the while, and thunders so that I cannot hear what you say to the contrary."

Modern Moment: In 2021 the IQM makes the hidden visible, so visitors can enjoy the effect without damaging the quilt's bright colors. (Hidden Messages lit from behind:)

Double Nine Patch
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Ohio, dated August 14, 1907
Cotton; machine pieced, hand quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0273

If you wanted to hide information in a quilt, how would you do it? The maker of this piece quilted two dates on it: “Aug 14 1907” and “Feb 26 1824.” What do you think those dates might signify?

"Feb 26 1824" (digitally outlined in red):

Log Cabin, Sunshine and Shadow setting
Maker unidentified
Made in the United States, 1940-1950
Cotton; hand pieced and quilted
Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0354

In the dark, a black light will make this quilt’s quilting stitches glow. That is because the thread was treated with a fluorescent “optical brightener” to make the white seem more white.

Glowing threads under a black light:

Original, Whisky and Watermelon
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Pennsylvania, dated January 23, 1901
Cotton; hand appliquéd and quilted, machine pieced
Jonathan Holstein and Gail van der Hoof Collection, 2003.003.0156

We don't know what the quiltmaker called this design, but the person who collected the quilt in the 1970s named it Whiskey and Watermelon. Do you think the green shapes are watermelons or something else? What else might be stored in the jugs? Bonus hidden messages: “DCK” and “Jan 23 1901” in the quilting of the upper right corner.

"Jan 23 1901" (digitally outlined in red):

Original
Maker unidentified
Possibly made in Kansas, c. 1936
Cotton; hand appliquéd and quilted
IQM, Ardis and Robert James Collection, 1997.007.0488

Republicans Alfred Landon and Frank Knox ran against incumbents Franklin Delano Roosevelt and John Nance Garner in the 1936 U.S. presidential election, and lost. Can you find the Landon/Knox campaign logo on these fabrics?

Hint:

HIDDEN MESSAGES: Quilts are a form of visual communication. What they communicate is sometimes immediately apparent. At other times, cracking their code can be more difficult.

Modern Makers: Modern Meets Modern Artist Bios

Modern Makers: Modern Meets Modern Artist Bios
Modern Makers: Modern Meets Modern Artist Bios

Victoria Findlay Wolfe has been sewing and creating since she was four years old. Influenced by her grandmother’s quilts, her work has an improvisational nature with a respect for traditional patterns and techniques. Every time she makes a quilt, she attempts to approach it with fresh eyes and without preconceptions, thus keeping the conversation of possibility in design open. Victoria’s work masterfully balances the genres of studio, traditional and modern quilts with a flair for bringing the fine art of quilting to the modern age. She works in all facets of the quilting world: first as an artist, but also as author, teacher, fabric designer and business owner. She exhibits, teaches, and lectures all over the world.

Thomas Knauer began his career teaching design at Drake University before turning to quilting. He has designed fabrics for several leading manufacturers, and his work has been exhibited in quilt shows and museums across the country, including the International Quilt Museum, San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles, and the Quilt Festival in Houston. His work focuses on issues of social justice and violence; his most recent body of work deals with the recent police shootings of unarmed black men and children. Thomas is the author of Why We Quilt, as well as two previous books, including The Quilt Design Coloring Workbook and Modern Quilt Perspectives. Find him online at www.thomasknauersews.com

Paula Leber has been a passionate quiltmaker for the past 15 years and is a member of the National Modern Quilt Guild. Her quiltmaking philosophy is to use color, color, and more color, which she believes aligns with the Modern Quilt Movement’s overall emphasis on intense use of hue and saturation. Paula made her Fractured Triangles quilt using a pattern by Katie Larson, which won a design contest held by the Kansas City Modern Quilt Guild (KCMQG). The KCMQG subsequently published the pattern in 2013 and it became a source of income for the guild. Paula, an avid gardener, lives in Shawnee Mission, Kansas and a has a yard full of flowers as well as a water garden, all of which she loves to maintain and enjoy when she’s not making quilts.

Teaching in her Seattle studio and nationally, Katie Pedersen merges improvisational techniques with modern and traditional quilting designs to create unique quilts. She is the co-author of Quilting Modern: Techniques and Projects for Improvisational Quilts and is a past president and founding member of the Seattle Modern Quilt Guild. Katie believes that making something by hand takes each of us on a journey of discovering who we are as artists, and that this personal process starts simply by sewing two pieces of fabric together. She loves that quilts are utilitarian art that showcase the evolution of one’s creative confidence and developing aesthetic, be it modern, traditional or a mix mash. You can visit Katie online at sewkatiedid.com

Having written the first book on Modern Quilting, Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr are pioneers of the Modern Quilt Movement and co-founders of Modern Quilt Studio, in Oak Park, Illinois. Weeks made her first modern quilt in 1987 and began collaborating with Bill in 1995. Weeks and Bill are prolific fabric designers, authors of six books on Modern Quilting, and are the publishers of Modern Quilts Illustrated and a variety of other publications. Together with their daughter they wrote the best-selling children’s sewing book, A Kid’s Guide to Sewing. Their work has been featured in over 100 publications in the US, Japan, France, Sweden, Canada and Australia. Weeks and Bill have taught extensively throughout the US, Canada, Japan (in Japanese) and France (in French). Weeks and Bill strive to inspire quilters of all ages and quilting styles to make quilts they will use and love.

Originally from New York, Maritza Soto grew up in a family of makers. Her passion for making art led her to a BFA from Parsons School of Design. In 2008, Maritza started making quilts, fusing her love for making art, design, and crafting. Maritza’s quilts have been exhibited at the International Quilt Festival (2018), QuiltCon (2017, 2018, 2020), as part of traveling selections of QuiltCon quilts in France, Spain, and Australia, and in group shows at the Washington Street Gallery (Somerville, MA). Her quilts have appeared in Quilting with a Modern Slant, by Rachel May (2014), and Modern Quilts: Designs of the New Century, by Alissa Haight Carlton and Riane Menardi Morrison (2017). Currently, Maritza teaches quilting and sewing at Gather Here, in Cambridge, MA. She has taught there for 10 years. She is a member of the Modern Quilt Guild.

Kathy York is a fiber artist whose award-winning quilts are easily recognizable for their graphic styles and bright colors. Kathy makes quilts to give her life experiences a voice. “I like to get lost in thought as the many hours drift by while working on a quilt.  It is during these moments that I get my best ideas about how to proceed with a piece and what it means to me. When the concept becomes intertwined with the design, I am happy.” Common themes that recur include group dynamics, universal emotions, and current events. Her imagery is associative, often making allusions to personal and shared cultural experiences. Kathy lives in Austin, TX. You can follow her process and current works on social media (Facebook and Instagram), and on her blog: www.aquamoonartquilts.blogspot.com

IQM's Modern Quilt Guild Collection

IQM's Modern Quilt Guild Collection
IQM's Modern Quilt Guild Collection

The International Quilt Museum is dedicated to building a global collection that represents the cultural and artistic significance of quilts from all eras, including today. One of the strongest influences in the 21st century is the Modern Quilt Movement, a catch-all term for a variety of approaches that sometimes focus on boldly colored solid fabrics, spare but distinctive compositions, and sophisticated quilting patterns in abundant negative space. Like any movement, however, there are many variations, and “Modern” accommodates a range of styles, from new takes on traditional patterns to avant-garde explorations.

In order to tell the story of what is happening in today’s quiltmaking, the International Quilt Museum began collecting Modern quilts several years ago. More recently, the IQM and the Modern Quilt Guild partnered with the Robert and Ardis James Foundation to create a Modern Quilt Guild collection, which will illustrate the evolution of the modern quilt aesthetic and document the current design and quilt trends as evidenced at such juried exhibitions as QuiltCon, International Quilt Festival and Festival of Quilts. 

Bonus Modern: Selections from the IQM's new MQG Collection

Bonus Modern: Selections from the IQM's new MQG Collection

Lincoln
Kim Soper
Huntington, New York, 2016
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Modern Quilt Guild Collection, Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Foundation, IQM 2021.039.0001

Modern Moment: Lincoln wins the People’s Choice and First Place Improvisation awards at QuiltCon 2017

Deconstructed LoneStar
Amy Struckmeyer
Oak Park, Illinois, 2015
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Modern Quilt Guild Collection, Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Foundation, IQM

Modern Moment: Deconstructed LoneStar wins the Second Place Modern Traditionalism award at QuiltCon 2015

Going Up
Stephanie Skardal
Clemmons, North Carolina, 2017
Cotton; machine pieced and quilted
Modern Quilt Guild Collection, Gift of the Robert and Ardis James Foundation, IQM

Modern Moment: Going Up wins Best in Show at QuiltCon 2018

Bonus Modern: Selections from the IQM's new MQG Collection
Support for this exhibition has been provided by the sponsors listed above, and by contributions from visitors like you.
Event Date
Friday, September 24, 2021 to Saturday, March 19, 2022